Building on our previous posts regarding messaging patterns and queue-based processing, we now explore stream-based processing and how it helps you achieve low-latency, near real-time data processing in your applications. AWS offers two managed services for streaming, Amazon Kinesis and Amazon Managed Streaming for Apache Kafka (Amazon MSK). What is streaming data? At AWS, we define streaming data as data that is emitted at high volume in a continuous, incremental manner with the goal of low-latency processing. Whereas traditional batch-oriented business intelligence would offer insights in retrospect after months, days, or hours have passed, stream-based processing can offer actionable insights in real time. Stream-based processingRead More →

In previous blog posts in this messaging series, we provided an overview of messaging and we also explained the common characteristics to consider when  evaluating messaging channel technologies. In this post, we will explain some of the semantics of queue-based processing, its use in designing flexible systems, and how to apply it to your use cases. AWS offers two queue-based services: Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS) and Amazon MQ. We will focus on SQS in this blog. Building Blocks In the digital world, even the most basic design of web based systems requires the use of queues to integrate applications. SQS is a secure, serverless,Read More →

We hope you’ve enjoyed reading our posts on best practices for your serverless applications. The posts in the following series will focus on best practices when introducing messaging patterns into your applications. Let’s review some core messaging concepts and see how they can be used to address challenges when designing modern cloud architectures. Introduction Applications can communicate information with each other using messages, a mechanism for packaging a data payload and associated metadata. The application that sends a message is called the producer and the application that receives the message is called the consumer. Producers and consumers exchange messages using a variety of transportation channels, for example point-to-point requests, messageRead More →

This is the third and final blog within a three-part series that examines how to optimize lift-and-shift workloads. A lift-and-shift is a common approach for migrating to AWS, whereby you move a workload from on-prem with little or no modification. This third blog examines how lift-and-shift workloads can benefit from an improved security posture with no modification to the application codebase. (Read about optimizing a lift-and-shift for performance and for cost effectiveness.) Moving to AWS can help to strengthen your security posture by eliminating many of the risks present in on-premise deployments. It is still essential to consider how to best use AWS security controlsRead More →